Prosthetics


Braces



Bridges




Braces

Today, people of almost all ages are benefiting from braces. Braces not only improve the look of teeth that are crooked or crowded. They can improve an irregular bite and correct jaw positioning and jaw joint disorders.
Braces are worn to apply pressure to and reposition the teeth, usually over the a few months to longer for more advanced cases.
To place braces, your dentist or orthodontist bonds brackets made of metal, ceramic, or plastic to your teeth. Then she places wires through the brackets, which guide the teeth into their correct positions. Sometimes, dentists can attach lingual braces to the backs of teeth, hiding them from view.
After your braces are attached -- and after each visit in which your dentist tightens your braces -- expect some discomfort for a few days. Also, regular oral hygiene becomes especially important while you are wearing braces.
Risks with braces are minimal. But people with allergies to metal or latex, or those who have periodontal disease, are at greater risk for problems during treatment. Root shortening is also a problem if teeth are moved too quickly.
An alternative for correcting minor spacing problems involves wearing a series of clear, customized appliances called aligners, or invisible braces. Your dentist will reshape and replace them about every two weeks to progressively move your teeth. Unlike traditional braces, aligners can be removed while eating, brushing, and flossing.
Often there are two phases to treatment with braces: wearing braces, and then using a retainer to hold your teeth in their new position. Retainers can be removable or permanently bonded in behind your teeth.

Types of braces:
1. Metal braces/Traditional braces
These are the metal brackets and wires that most people picture when they hear the word "braces." However, modern brackets are smaller and less noticeable than the notorious "metal-mouth" braces than many adults remember. Plus, new heat-activated archwires use your body heat to help teeth move more quickly and less painfully than in the past.
2. Ceramic Braces
Ceramic braces are the same size and shape as metal braces, except that they have tooth-colored or clear brackets that blend in to teeth. Some even use tooth-colored wires to be even less noticeable.
3. Lingual braces are the same as traditional metal braces, except that the brackets and wires are placed on the inside of teeth.

Mobile prosthetics
The missing of the teeth is still a problem. One appropriate method for this replacement is the use of a mobile brace.
1. The standard total brace-the imitate whole set of upper and lower teeth, and is used as vacuum in order to be placed.
2. Partial braces-are used to replace only the missing teeth and soft gums.
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Bridges

Sometimes called a fixed partial denture, bridges are used to replace missing teeth with artificial teeth. Bridges can be made of gold, alloys, porcelain, or a combination. Dentists anchor them onto surrounding teeth after preparing them for crowns. Then a false tooth joins to the crowns and the bridge is cemented onto the prepared teeth. Only your dentist can remove a fixed bridge.
The success of your bridge depends upon its foundation. So, remember that oral hygiene to keep remaining teeth healthy is particularly important if you wear a bridge.

Fixed prosthetics

Crowns
Sometimes called caps, crowns completely cover a tooth, restoring a normal shape and appearance. You may need a crown to:
• Cover a misshapen or discolored tooth
• Protect a weak tooth
• Restore a broken or worn tooth
• Cover a tooth with a large filling
• Hold a dental bridge in place
• Cover a dental implant
• Cover a tooth that's had a root canal procedure
Crowns can be made from metal, porcelain fused to metal, resin, or ceramic materials. Because crowns are costly, dentists usually suggest them only when other procedures can't produce a pleasing result.
Sometimes, a dentist can make an in-office same-day crown, or a temporary crown. Some offices can mill a crown in the same day. The dentist prepares the tooth for the crown, makes molds of the tooth or takes a digital impression, provides you with a temporary crown if sending it to a lab, and then places the permanent crown at a separate time.
Permanent crowns can have a long life if you take good care of .
The dental bridge is used to supplement one or more missing teeth. They are constructed in order to satisfy the right and aesthetic look of the teeth with the right occlusion.


Inlays and onlays

Dental inlays and onlays are gold, composite, or porcelain materials used to repair moderately damaged or decayed teeth. Dentists use dental inlays and onlays to restore a tooth that is too damaged to repair with a filling but not damaged enough to need a crown. Dental inlays and onlays save the healthy portion of an injured tooth and provide strength and stability for normal chewing.
A dental inlay is placed in the center area of the tooth. A dental onlay is placed on the inside and outside areas, or points, of a tooth. Dental inlays and onlays are also called indirect fillings or partial crowns. They are a less aggressive and usually less expensive treatment option than full crowns.
Placing a dental inlay or onlay is generally considered safe, but there are risks and potential complications. It is only one method used to repair damaged or decayed teeth. Discuss all of your options with your dentist to understand which options are right for you.

Types of dental inlays and onlays
Dental inlays and onlays can be made of the following materials:
• Composites (resins) include powdered glass-like material and acrylics. Composite inlays and onlays are more cosmetically pleasing than metal because they match the tooth’s color.
• Metal, typically gold, but other metals may be used as well. Dentists may use metal inlays or onlays in back teeth, or molars, because of metal’s strength and durability. Today, gold is used less often than in the past because it is less cosmetically pleasing than other types of inlays and onlays.
• Porcelain matches the tooth’s color.
Your dentist may recommend a dental inlay or onlay for conditions including:
• Cracked or chipped teeth that cannot be repaired with a dental filling but do not require more extensive procedures to repair, such as a root canal and/or dental crown.
• Tooth decay (cavities, dental caries) that occurs when bacteria in your mouth produce an acid that damages the teeth. Dentists can often repair minor to moderate decay with a dental filing. Moderate to severe or deep decay may require a dental inlay or onlay or crown to save the function of the tooth.